Here's the transit system we have

It has too many gaps, so it's hard to get around Chicagoland.


It doesn't connect enough people to job centers.


In too many places, driving is the only way to go—that means more traffic and pollution.

Here's the one we could have

Over the years, the region has dreamed up dozens of game-changing transit lines.













Transit Future is a campaign to make them a reality.







Meet the transit lines that could transform Chicagoland.













CHICAGO

THE SOUTH LAKEFRONT SERVICE

The South Lakefront Service connects the South Side to the Loop.

The South Lakefront Service could run on existing train tracks.







It would connect Chicagoans to 50,000 jobs in Hyde Park.

THE LIME LINE

Like a west side Red Line, the Lime will be a speedy north-south route along Chicago's edge.

The Lime connects to the Blue, Green, Pink, Orange, and Red lines.

That makes it easier for West Siders to get to jobs.

At Midway, the Lime Line heads east through South Side transit deserts.




It connects to the Red Line at 87th street.

ASHLAND

BUS RAPID TRANSIT

Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) is like a subway on the street.



Ashland BRT

Buses have their own lanes and elevated stations. They can turn stoplights green, to slice through rush hour traffic.

BRT on Ashland will run from the North Side to the Far South Side.



It will connect to five L lines and two commuter rail lines.

The route also runs by

  • Rush Medical Center
  • UIC
  • Malcolm X College
  • Whitney Young High School

Now everyone can get to school—and to the hospital.

RED LINE EXTENSION

The far South Side is no longer left behind.

The Red Line extension will cut commute times to the Loop.

That will bring opportunity to Roseland, Pullman, and Altgeld Gardens.

BROWN LINE EXTENSION

Connects the North Side to O'Hare.









You can finally make that flight on time.

People in Albany Park and Mayfair can take the L to jobs, school, and beyond.

RED LINE MODERNIZATION

The Red Line is over a hundred years old.

For faster North Side commutes, we need to rebuild the L track from Lakeview to Evanston.

BLUE LINE MODERNIZATION:

FOREST PARK BRANCH

The Blue Line route to Forest Park is filled with slow zones.

Many stations are not wheelchair accessible.









Fixing track and stations will make the line faster for everyone.

ADDITIONAL PROJECTS

West Loop Transportation Center

  • The region's new transit hub.
  • Jump from Amtrak, to commuter rail, to the L.
  • One day, this could be Chicago's high-speed rail station.




Orange Line Extension

  • Extending the Orange Line to Ford City Mall and Richard J. Daley College means shops, jobs and classrooms are just an L stop away.

Road projects

  • These projects will make bridges and tunnels for freight trains. No more waiting for the train to pass.
  • 63rd/Harlem bridge or tunnel
  • Central/54th St. bridge or tunnel
  • Columbus/Maplewood Ave bridge or tunnel
  • Archer/Kenton Ave bridge or tunnel
  • 87th/Rockwell bridge or tunnel
  • 95th/Eggleston bridge or tunnel
  • Pershing/Morgan bridge or tunnel

SOUTH SUBURBS

THE SOUTHEAST SERVICE

Commuter rail connecting the South Suburbs to jobs in the Loop and beyond.

Will help rebuild suburban downtowns around new train stations.

SOUTH SUBURBAN

ART NETWORK

Arterial Rapid Transit (ART) Lines will bring speedy, frequent bus service to major streets.

They have new, high-speed buses, special stations, and can turn the stoplights green.

Unlike BRT, they don't have dedicated road lanes.

But they can jump ahead of traffic jams at major intersections.

WEST SUBURBS

AIRPORT CONNECTOR EXPRESS

Connects O’Hare to Midway airport.










Yes, really.

Connects Western suburbs to each other.

BLUE LINE EXTENSION

FOREST PARK TO OAK BROOK

Extends the Blue Line from Forest Park to Oak Brook.





Creates a fast commute to one of our region's top job centers.

WEST SUBURBAN

ART NETWORK

Arterial Rapid Transit (ART) Lines will bring speedy, frequent bus service to major streets.

They have new, high-speed buses, special stations, and can turn the stoplights green.

Unlike BRT, they don't have dedicated road lanes.

But they can jump ahead of traffic jams at major intersections.

NORTH SUBURBS

BLUE LINE EXTENSION

O'HARE TO SCHAUMBURG

Connects the Northwest suburbs to O'Hare.

This is huge for employment.

Chicagoans can get to Schaumburg — one of the region's top job centers.

West suburban residents can get to jobs at O'Hare.

PURPLE LINE MODERNIZATION

The Purple Line is over 100 years old.

Rebuilding the tracks means faster commutes from the North Suburbs to the city.

And quicker trips from the city.

YELLOW LINE EXTENSION

Extends the Yellow line to Old Orchard Mall in Skokie.

Now everyone can work, shop, and study at the Mall, National Louis University, and Niles North High School.

NORTH SUBURBAN

ART NETWORK

Arterial Rapid Transit (ART) Lines will bring speedy, frequent bus service to major streets.

They have new, high-speed buses, special stations, and can turn the stoplights green.

Unlike BRT, they don't have dedicated road lanes.

But they can jump ahead of traffic jams at major intersections.







How do we pay for our Transit Future?

Los Angeles is doubling the size of its transit system.







How are they paying for it?

In 2008, Los Angeles residents voted to raise LA County's sales tax by just a ½-penny.







The result: $40 billion for new transit lines.

Realizing this vision means an investment of $20 billion.







That's a big number — but there's a way to get there.

The Cook County Board of Commissioners can create a robust revenue stream to fund the construction of these new train and bus lines.







This local revenue will open the door to federal and other financing tools that will pay for the rest.







Transit Future is a campaign to convince the Cook County Board to create that local revenue stream—and to do it soon.







Who supports Transit Future?

Cook County Commissioners

Deborah Sims Earlean Collins Edwin Reyes Jerry Butler Joan Murphy Larry Suffredin Peter Silvestri Robert Steele




Business

All Points BLUE1647 Bombardier Christopher B. Burke Engineering Faithful + Gould Ice Miller McCaffery Interests MGLM Perkins + Will Revolution Brewing RPEG SBA Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Solomon Cordwell Buenz




Labor

Chicago Federation of Labor Cook County Building Trades Electricians local 9 Electricians Local 134 Iron Workers District Council Operating Engineers Local 150 Roofers Local 11 Sheet Metal Local 73




Community and civic organizations

Access Living Active Transportation Alliance Alternative Transportation for Chicagoland Bethel New Life Bronzeville Retail Initiative Bronzeville Urban Development Center for Neighborhood Technology Chicago Jobs Council Claretian Associates CNU Delta Associates Developing Communities Project Enlace Chicago Environmental Defenders of McHenry County Far South Community Development Corporation Greater Auburn-Gresham Community Development Corporation GECDC ICA MoveLA Openlands Over The Rainbow Association Progress Center for Independent Living Quad Communities Development Corporation RAGE Roosevelt University Southeast Environmental Task Force Teamwork Englewood UIC Transportation Center\ Universidad Popular

Transit Future Leadership

These leaders from Cook County's business, civic, labor and cultural communities are guiding the campaign:

Frank Beal – Executive Director, Metropolis Strategies

Carole Brown – Managing Director, Barclay’s Capital

Christopher Burke – Founder and President, Christopher B. Burke Engineering

Warren Chapman – Senior Vice President, Columbia College

Graham Grady - Partner, Taft Law

David Mosena – President and CEO, Chicago Museum of Science and Industry

Robert G. Reiter, Jr. - Secretary-Treasurer, Chicago Federation of Labor

Steve Schlickman – Executive Director, Urban Transportation Center, UIC

John Schmidt – Partner, Mayer Brown

Tom Villanova – President, Chicago and Cook County Construction and Building Trades Council

Karen Walker – Managing Director, Siebert Brandford Shank & Co.

Doug Whitley – President and CEO, Illinois Chamber of Commerce

Bob Weissbourd – President, RW Ventures

Ed Woodbury - President, McCaffery Interests

Who is Transit Future?

Center for Neighborhood Technology

The Center for Neighborhood Technology (CNT) is an award-winning innovations laboratory for urban sustainability.

CNT works across disciplines and issues, including transportation and community development, energy, water, and climate change.



Active Transportation Alliance

The Chicago-based not-for-profit Active Transportation Alliance is co-leading the campaign. Active Transportation Alliance's mission is to make bicycling, walking and public transit so safe, convenient and fun that we will achieve a significant shift from environmentally harmful, sedentary travel to clean, active travel. We advocate for transportation that encourages and promotes safety, physical activity, health, recreation, social interaction, equity, environmental stewardship and resource conservation.

Learn more

Learn more about similar campaigns in Los Angeles, Toronto, Washington, D.C., Denver and Minneapolis

Learn more about Transit Future.

Learn more about CNT’s housing and transportation research.





Contact

If your organization wants to join the campaign, contact Jacky Grimshaw.

Member of the media? Contact Ryan Kilpatrick.





Graphics

System map

Feel free to re-use our Transit Future map: large, small, vector.





Code

Github

The code that powers this website is available on Github for all to re-use.

This website was built by

OpenCity + Cartografika

  • Nick Doiron
  • Adam Jentleson
  • Taylor McKinley
  • Edward Oser
  • Catalina Velez
  • Juan-Pablo Velez

Want to get in touch with us? Email transitfuture@opencityapps.org.